MarketingTechnology

New report enables sports clubs to put a price on social video

February 9, 2017

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MarketingTechnology

New report enables sports clubs to put a price on social video

February 9, 2017

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The social video intelligence company, Burst Insights, have released a new report which enables sports clubs to monetise their social video content.

The report analyses the kit supplier brand exposure of the 1,000 best performing short social videos across 2015/16 Premier League clubs. The findings reveal that social videos had an impressive combined value of £88 million among Premier League teams last season.

In addition to analysing the total value of social video, the 90-page report also includes an analysis of the market forces behind social video on sports sponsorship, a confirmation of how to monetise social video content and an outline of important content trends to help sports clubs optimise fan engagement.

BI Report Chelsea ShowcaseThe report addresses a problem many sports clubs experience when having to put a price on this high-potential new content medium. The problem is resolved by setting up a framework from where sports organisations and sponsorship partners mutually can get greater social video performance insights and enables commercial managers to report a brand exposure ROI value.

Brands are more interested in content engagement, which is why Burst Insights has developed a system that is built around valuing social engagement and turning it into a social currency for brand value.

Many sports clubs treat the value of social video the same way as TV exposure, a method Burst Insights have warned clubs against using. The company’s Head of Research, Simon Bibby, explained:

“TV viewership is declining while content engagement on social media platforms is exploding. As a result, the value to brands of partnering with sports clubs is shifting from infrequent TV exposure to the continuous content approach that all clubs are now adopting. Valuing TV brand exposure is based on passive viewership figures and it is a mistake to see social video as simply an extension of TV audiences.”

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Last month we reported that Manchester United were back as the top earning club in the world, largely down to TV broadcasting rights deals. While TV rights are contributing a vital role off the pitch to a club’s bottom line, the impact of social video content produced by teams is still yet to make its commercial debut.

It should come as no surprise that Manchester United also top the Premier League social video value table. The Red Devils and Chelsea were the only clubs to earn over £1m valuation from their top 60 performing social videos with £1,130,625 and £1,086,000 respectively.

BI-Report---page-peel-v1Here are some other key findings from the report;

The top 5% of videos (around 60 per club) posted on Instagram, Twitter and Vine was worth £3.5m in kit supplier brand exposure value. Using our brand value algorithm from the report, we estimate that social video posted by Premier League clubs last season was worth £88m in kit supplier brand value including Facebook and YouTube.

A reported total of £222.75m in sponsorship fees was spent by Premier League kit supplier sports brands across the league last season. The brand with the best average brand exposure across their club partner’s best performing social videos was Puma (appearing 55% of content, which was 92 out of 170 videos by Puma sponsored clubs)

Social video is often seen as playing a supporting role to broadcast coverage. 58.3% of fan favourite videos came from the match day event (pre,during,post game).

Short match clips made up 29.3 % of all videos analysed. Providing a key assist was pre match footage (19%), while interviews ranked 3rd with 16.1%. Training ground footage shared 7% of the spotlight, aiding clubs with separate training kit/ground sponsorship deals.

If you want to purchase the whole report you can find it here.

 

Written by Kieran Foley

Kieran is an assistant Content Editor at Future Sport specialising in sports business and economics.

Kieran Foley

Kieran is an assistant Content Editor at Future Sport specialising in sports business and economics.