BusinessMarketing

How to Monetize Fan-Created Content

April 7, 2017

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BusinessMarketing

How to Monetize Fan-Created Content

April 7, 2017

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Yesterday we learned why it was important for brands to create experiences for fans and what partners want form their sponsors. Todays focus will be monetizing content created by the fans.

Seven ways to monetize fan-created content

Fans sitting in stadiums, scrolling through their social media, are in fact being monetized by those platforms tracking this activity as quality impressions. Eyeballs are now on smartphones, not on stadium signage, and teams need to take notice. Below are a few tools that can help teams take ownership of fan content as property owners, in a way that’s more cohesive and monetized.

ComparisonChart

On-Site Photo Booths

Step in front of a green screen and get your high quality photos with branded overlays that can be shared to social media, fun props available to users

Analysis: While quality of engagement is high for those users, it’s difficult to produce a large volume of photos due to the physical set-up and capacity limits. Assuming each user takes 90 seconds, in a 3 hour period, you can only have a maximum of 120 users with photo shares.

In-Stadium Kiss Cams

Camera operators find a few lucky fans in the crowd, streaming it to the big screen for everyone in the building to watch.

Analysis: Emotional energy is encapsulated in the few seconds each lucky fan gets on the big screen. However with only a 30-60 seconds of total screen time, opportunity is very limited. When considering content scalability, unless a clip is posted to social media and becomes viral, any substantial brand exposure ends within the walls of the arena.

kisscam

Fan Controlled Cameras

Fans use their smartphone to remote-control a camera from their seats, finding themselves instantly, and capture the entire experience of being at the game in a high quality photo.

Analysis: Any fan can access this interactive experience during the game and share their photo instantly, automating both content production and distribution. The quality of engagement is also high because the entire experience is white-labelled for the brand, and the photo itself is professional grade.

Fan Video Apps

After the game finishes, fans can download an app to retrieve video clips from the big screen where they may have made an appearance.

Analysis: The video content retrieval process is fun and easily share-worthy for the lucky fans that got on the big screen. When looking at the scalability of content, only the lucky few can retrieve these videos and have to download an app to do so, most of the engagement occurs after the game for the footage to be processed, when momentum could have faded.

Fan Photo Apps

After the game finishes, fans can download an app to retrieve candid photos that were taken of them during the game.

Analysis: These photos capture exciting in-game moments for every fan in the arena, but the candid-nature of the photo reduces the quality of content fans may find, and this content may be less share-worthy. Similar to the video apps, it requires fans to wait until post-game to be able to share photos, and often the retrieval process is difficult to find themselves amidst the crowd.

Hashtag contests

Fans share photos to social media with a branded hashtag for a chance to get on the big screen or the team’s website.

Analysis: The opportunity to have their digital content transmitted to the big screen is appealing, though only few fans will get the exposure. From a sponsorship standpoint there is no branding attached on any of the photos except by willful association. Overall this leads to easy access for fans, but very low quality engagement for brand sponsors.

Snapchat GeoFilters

Fans with the Snapchat app can engage with a branded filter on their selfie, sharing it with their immediate friend group.

Analysis: Snapchat is known to be highly engaging, but the content created is intentionally limited to an internal group of Snapchat friends, making it difficult to scale the content distribution.

Written by Brandon Johnson

Brandon Johnson

University Student studying International Business at Richmond, The American International University in London and Intern at WePlay Digital Sports Agency.

Brandon Johnson

University Student studying International Business at Richmond, The American International University in London and Intern at WePlay Digital Sports Agency.